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-Business Models-

Not Every Client Gets to Fly First Class

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Not Every Client Gets to Fly First Class

Do the people in your firm complain about an overwhelming number of simultaneous priorities? Does every task and client request have an ASAP attached to it?  Not every client has paid the price of a first-class seat in your organization, and your organization doesn’t have the human or economic resources to lavish first-class service on clients who only paid a coach price …

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Don’t Change Your Practices, Change Your Mind

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Don’t Change Your Practices, Change Your Mind

Business professionals have a voracious appetite for the “best practices” in their industry. But transformative changes in society are always the result of changing our thinking, not changing our practices.  When we reform our paradigm — our mental map — we can’t help but change our practices …

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Rebuilding Your Business Model

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Rebuilding Your Business Model

Most leaders have never stopped to consciously identify, examine and modernize the interlocking pieces of their business model framework. In truth, precious few leaders of professional firms could even map the elements of their business model on a piece of paper. So when we see headlines about “the death of the agency business model,” the issue is more a matter of benign neglect than mismanagement …

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You Don’t Sell Your Own Product as Well as You Sell Your Client’s

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You Don’t Sell Your Own Product as Well as You Sell Your Client’s

It’s a curious fact that advertising agencies don’t know much about selling — at least when it comes to selling their own brand. Even though agency professionals show good sense (and sometimes sheer brilliance) when crafting messaging strategies for their clients, this is rarely applied to how they market themselves…

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An Open Letter to Marketers: Caveat Emptor

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An Open Letter to Marketers: Caveat Emptor

“Buyer beware” might also be described as “sold as is” — a warning about deals that seem too good to be true. Given the power currently ceded to procurement professionals inside client organizations, “caveat emptor” applies to agency-client relationships more than ever before...

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